Tag Archives: Marketing and Advertising

A Place Where Everybody Knows Your Name

I had a conversation with my friend Mike Sansone today and he told me about an interesting project of his. He’s working on a project called Dialing 8. He had spoken to me before about what it was but after our conversation today, I now think I really “get” it.

Picture it. You walk into your neighbourhood bar and sit at your favorite table. It’s a place you frequent almost everyday so you know most of the people there. As you sit down with your friends, order your favourite drink and start talking, you look over at another table and some of your other “cronies” are there, talking about something completely different. You’re interested in what they are saying so you listen, put in your two cents and then go back to your own conversation. When you have a question, you know that there will be someone close by who can help you because the bar is filled with other like-minded people, some with similar interests, some with complementary interests. The entire place is a wealth of knowledge, camaraderie and comfort.

After speaking with Mike, this is the mental picture I got of what he wants Dialing-8 to become. A virtual hangout filled with those who are well versed in social media, as well as those who need some guidance learning how to take their business from the offline world to the online arena. It can include tutorials, guidance, webinars and support. While I won’t go into all the details of the Dialing-8 project, the goal is to ensure that we can all stay strong and last long in social media. Social media is, after all, not a sprint but a marathon and while it’s easy to get caught up in initial dash, it’s those who can pace themselves that will demonstrate staying power.

After we ended our call, I started thinking about his idea. The more I thought about it, the more I decided that I like his vision. I really, really like it. As a social media consultant (or coach, as Mike would say) I’m on my own a great deal, working hard to help my clients, mostly small businesses, learn the ins and outs of social media. I love what I do but it can, at times, be isolating, working everyday as a Solopreneur. The idea of having a place to hang out with like-minded individuals, doing what I like to do best is very appealing. A place where I can go, where there will always be someone who “has my back” and a place where I can be available to help others.

Dialing-8 will launch on November 13 for a cost of $271 per year. If my math is correct (and you had better check it) it works out to 74 cents a day. If it is anything like I envision it will be, I know that it will be a wealth of knowledge, companionship and support. I encourage you to give it a try. I know I will.

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Melissa Reyes Joins Social Media Madness As A Featured Contributor

Social Media Madness, along with ADR Social Media Development, is so excited to announce that Melissa Reyes, owner of the Social Amateur, will be joining our team as a regular contributor to this blog.  The Social Amateur emerged out of Melissa’s passion for social media marketing and her desire to help others navigate this tricky online marketing world. Melissa’s writing is a wonderful mix of how-to’s, insights,  answers and resources geared toward helping small businesses create and implement an effective social media strategy.  Her authenticity and genuine love for helping others is evident each of her posts.  Please help me welcome Melissa to Social Media Madness. I know that we will all benefit from her presence.

More About Melissa Reyes… In Her Own Words

Hi! I’m Melissa. I’m a mom, a Twitter addict, a full-time social media manager at a professional trade association and the owner of Social Amateur, a strategic consulting company focused on helping small businesses navigate the world of social media marketing and connect with clients.

My background is in graphic design, copy writing and marketing. I have been fortunate to work with amazing and extremely creative minds, in both major companies and small businesses, over the past 10 years. From large sports franchises and major medical centers to small local start-ups and independent contractors, I have helped businesses build their brands, connect with their clients and succeed, even in challenging markets.

Social Amateur was born out of my passion for social media marketing, and the desire to share my experience and knowledge with small business owners and professionals. I love helping small businesses develop and execute winning marketing campaigns, and I believe that social media is an integral piece of an effective strategy.

Ok, so why the name Social Amateur? I guess I could call myself an “expert, or “guru,” but the truth is that social media is a big. Really big. And growing every day. There are new networks, new algorithms and new technologies every day. Even with years of experience in inbound marketing, I still learn something new every day. I don’t know it all, but I believe that you don’t need to be an expert to make social media marketing work for you and your business. You just need someone to help you learn, develop a plan, execute and grow. And that’s where we come in.

Five Steps To Finding Your Stride In Social Media

It’s very likely that anyone in the social media field has heard the phrase “social media is not a sprint but a marathon.” As I continue to learn more and more about the social media market and as my client load grows, I realize more than ever that this statement is one hundred percent true.

When most of us start out in social media, it’s hard not to behave like a kid in a candy store. We want to be on all the social platforms, we start conversations at every turn, we tweet, we post and we follow everyone we come across. While this strategy may work well in the beginning, it is definitely difficult to sustain in the long run. Especially as your list of clients and client responsibility grows. We want to do it all but it’s nearly impossible to do so without burning yourself out very quickly. So what steps should a social media consultant take in order to be able to finish the marathon without running out of steam? Hopefully, these five steps can help you put things into perspective:

  • Remember what your goals are – In the vast world of social media, it’s easy to get distracted with what our competitors are doing – some may be flashier, louder and brighter than we are. But that’s ok. Remember what you are doing and why you are here. Stick to your goals and work to achieve them.
  • Assess and re-assess your social platforms – In social media, while it can be fun and exciting to put yourself or your client on every social platform, it’s very likely that not every platform or network is appropriate for every client. If you continuously monitor your audience’s interactions on the different social networks, you can decide which one’s work best for your client and cut the rest loose. It may be better, in the long run, to focus on a few key platforms successfully than be engaged in all of them half-heartedly.
  • Get rid of the noise – This step is probably the hardest one for most of us to follow. Not all relationships online will be to your benefit. Some relationships will only ever be one-sided; some only take, without ever giving back. No matter how many followers, friends or connections you have, if they aren’t in line with your business philosophies, it may be time to cut them loose.
  • Pace yourself – It really isn’t a race. Whether you’re managing your own business or someone else’s, it’s important to remember that if you lose a few followers or “likes” because you aren’t posting or tweeting 5 times an hour, they weren’t really very loyal to begin with. It’s better to establish meaningful relationships with fewer followers than a superficial relationship with many.
  • If you fail, pick yourself up and start again – Not every social media campaign will take off the way you expect it to. Not every post will generate 50 responses. That’s ok. Don’t be afraid to experiment. If something doesn’t work in your social media strategy, remember that those using social media have short attention spans. In 22 hours, 51 minutes, they’ll have forgotten what you said anyway.

Social media has no destination. It is, in fact, a means to an end. If you are able to stick to your goals, cut the noise, do the work and pace yourself, you will succeed in running the social media marathon. You may even place in the top three.